Radio Regulations Summary

REGULATIONS – Question Summaries
1. The Amateur Service may be briefly defined as: a radio communication service for the purpose of self-training, intercommunication and technical investigation
2. The organisation responsible for the International Radio Regulations is the: International Telecommunication Union
3. New Zealand’s views on international radio regulatory matters are coordinated by the: Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE)
4. For regulatory purposes the world is divided into regions each with different radio spectrum allocations. New Zealand is in: Region 3
5. The prime document for the administration of the Amateur Service in New Zealand is the: New Zealand Radiocommunications Regulations
6. The administration of the Amateur Service in New Zealand is by: Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) An Amateur Station is a station: in the Amateur Service
7. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency can be inspected by an authorised officer from the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE): at any time
8. The fundamental regulations controlling the Amateur Service are to be found in: the International Radio Regulations from the ITU
9. You must have a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency to: transmit in bands allocated to the Amateur Service
10. A New Zealand General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency allows you to operate: anywhere in New Zealand and in any other country that recognises the Certificate
11. With a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency you may operate transmitters in your station: any number at one time
12. You must keep the following document at your amateur station: your General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency
13. An Amateur Station is one which is: operated by the holder of a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency on the amateur radio bands
14. If the qualified operator of an amateur radio station is absent overseas, the home station may be used by: any person with an appropriate General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency
15. All amateur stations, regardless of the mode of transmission used, must be equipped with: a reliable means for determining the operating radio frequency
16. An amateur station may transmit unidentified signals: never, such transmissions are not permitted
17. You may operate your amateur radio station somewhere in New Zealand for short periods away from the location entered in the administration’s database: whenever you want to
18. Before operating an amateur station in a motor vehicle, you must: hold a current General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency
19. An applicant for a New Zealand General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency must first qualify by meeting the appropriate examination requirements. Application may then be made by: anyone
20. An amateur radio operator must have current New Zealand postal and email addresses so the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE): can send mail to the operator
21. If you transmit from another amateur’s station, the person responsible for its proper operation is: you, the operator
22. Your responsibility as a station operator is that you must: be responsible for the proper operation of the station in accordance with the Radiocommunications Regulations
23. An amateur station must have a qualified operator: whenever the station is used for transmitting
24. A log-book for recording stations worked: is recommended for all amateur radio operators
25. Unqualified persons in your family cannot transmit using your amateur station if they are alone with your equipment because they must: hold a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency before they are allowed to be operators
26. Amateur radio repeater equipment and frequencies in New Zealand are co-ordinated by: the NZART Frequency Management and Technical Advisory Group.
27. A qualified operator of an amateur radio station may permit anyone to: pass brief comments of a personal nature provided no fees or other considerations are requested or accepted
28. The minimum age for a person to hold a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency is: there is no age limit
29. If you contact another station and your signal is strong and perfectly readable, you should: reduce your transmitter power output to the minimum needed to maintain contact
30. The age when an amateur radio operator is required to surrender the General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency is: there is no age limit
31. Peak envelope power (PEP) output is the: average power output at the crest of the modulating cycle
32. The maximum power output permitted from an amateur station is: specified in the amateur radio General User Radio Licence
33. The transmitter power output for amateur stations at all times is: the minimum power necessary to communicate and within the terms of the amateur radio GURL
34. You identify your amateur station by transmitting your: callsign
35. This callsign could be allocated to an amateur radio operator in New Zealand: ZL2HF
36. The callsign of a New Zealand amateur radio station: is listed in the administration’s database
37. These letters are generally used for the first letters in New Zealand amateur radio callsigns: ZL
38. The figures normally used in New Zealand amateur radio callsigns are: a single digit, 1 through 4
39. Before re-issuing, a relinquished callsign is normally kept for: 1 year
40. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency authorises the use of: amateur radio transmitting apparatus only
41. General Amateur Operator Certificates of Competency and callsigns are issued pursuant to the Regulations by the: Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE) Approved Radio Examiners
42. To replace a written copy of your General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency you should: Download and print one from the official database (or have an Approved Radio Examiner do this for you)
43. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency holder must advise permanent changes to postal and email addresses and update the official database records within: 7 days
44. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency: contains the unique callsign(s) to be used by that operator
45. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency is normally issued for: life
46. A licence that provides for a given class of radio transmitter to be used without requiring a licence in the owner’s own name is known as: a general user radio licence
47. The holder of a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency may permit anyone to: pass brief messages of a personal nature provided no fees or other consideration are requested or accepted
48. International communications on behalf of third parties may be transmitted by an amateur station only if: such communications have been authorised by the countries concerned
49. The term “amateur third party communications” refers to: messages to or on behalf of non-licensed people or organisations
50. The Morse code signal SOS is sent by a station: in grave and imminent danger and requiring immediate assistance
51. If you hear distress traffic and are unable to render assistance, you should: maintain watch until you are certain that assistance is forthcoming
52. The transmission of messages in a secret code by the operator of an amateur station is: not permitted except for control signals by the licensees of remote beacon or repeater stations
53. Messages from an amateur station in the following are expressly forbidden: secret cipher
54. The term “harmful interference” means: interference which obstructs or repeatedly interrupts radiocommunication services
55. When interference to the reception of radiocommunications is caused by the operation of an amateur station, the station operator: must immediately comply with any action required by the MBIE to prevent the interference.
56. An amateur radio operator may knowingly interfere with another radio communication or signal: never
57. After qualifying and gaining a General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency you are permitted to: first operate for three months on amateur radio bands below 5 MHz and bands above 25 MHz to log fifty or more contacts
58. Morse code is permitted for use by: any amateur radio operator
59. As a New Zealand amateur radio operator you may communicate with: other amateur stations world-wide
60. As a New Zealand amateur radio operator you: may train for and support disaster relief activities
61. Your General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency permits you to: establish and operate an earth station in the amateur satellite service
62. You hear a station using the callsign “VK3XYZ stroke ZL” on your local VHF repeater. This is: the station of an overseas visitor
63. The abbreviation “HF” refers to the radio spectrum between: 3 MHz and 30 MHz
64. Bandplans showing the transmission modes for New Zealand amateur radio bands are developed and published for the mutual respect and advantage of all operators: to ensure that your operations do not impose problems on other operators and that their operations do not impact on you
65. The abbreviation “VHF” refers to the radio spectrum between: 30 MHz and 300 MHz
66. An amateur radio operator must be able to: verify that transmissions are within an authorised frequency band
67. An amateur station may be closed down at any time by: a demand from an authorised official of the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment (MBIE)
68. A General Amateur Operator Certificate of Competency: does not confer on its holder a monopoly on the use of any frequency or band
69. A person in distress: may use any means available to attract attention

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